Workshops

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What do you want to learn about: GMOs? Charcuterie? The connection between microbes and flavor? With 11 workshops to choose from – it’s just a matter of prioritizing.

Monday, November 4 - 10:30 – 11:45 AM:

  • A Vision of Greatness (Is Not a Strategic Plan) – A Workshop with Ari Weinzweig
  • GMOs: What Chefs Need to Know
  • Trash Fish: Bycatch Ceviche, Drum Heads & Other Tasty Treats
  • Vegetable Fermentation: Exploring the Possibilities – A Workshop with Sandor Katz
  • I Can Cure That – Hands On with Craig Deihl at Cypress *This workshop is full*
  • Mastering the Media

Read the full descriptions, and sign up for a workshop by October here. Several workshops have limited capacity, so don’t delay.

Tuesday Workshops – 9:45 – 11:00 AM:

  • Microbes and Flavor: A Closer Look at Fermentation - With Rachel Dutton, Dan Felder, and Ben Wolfe
  • Hogonomics – With Barry Estabrook, Chef Stephen Stryjewski, and More
  • Expanding Options for Sustainable Seafood – Moderated by Sheila Bowman
  • Sustainability: Table for Two, Four, or A Million
  • What We Talk About When We Talk About Aquaculture - With Paul Greenberg

Read the full descriptions, and sign up for a workshop by October here. Several workshops have limited capacity, so don’t delay.

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Monday Workshops - Full Descriptions

 

1. A Vision of Greatness (Is Not a Strategic Plan) – A Workshop with Ari Weinzweig

What’s a vision? It’s an answer to the simple—yet radical—question: “When we’re really successful in our work at a particular point in the future, what will our organization look like?” Imagine going to a website where you could log on and, with the right password, view your company as it will be five years from now. Well, the website (as far as we know) doesn’t exist yet. But you have the software you need right in your own head—and the heads of others in your organization. Join Zingerman’s co-founder Ari Weinzweig to learn how effective visioning has been an important part of Zingerman’s success and how you can use this powerful tool to fuel your business, and personal, success. Limited to 35. Register for the workshop. 

2. GMOs: What Chefs Need to Know - Moderated by Bonnie Powell

It’s no secret that genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are a charged issue. Do we need high tech solutions to solve the growing global hunger crisis? Are there safety issues? Is the often heard question ” how are we going feed the world?” a rallying cry of an agriculture more focused on growth than developing strategies to help communities feed themselves? Come find out what chefs need to know and engage in a lively discussion with four experts. Speakers: Urvashi Rangan (environmental health scientist and toxicologist, Consumer Reports), Mardi Mellon (senior scientist, Food & Environment Program, Union of Concerned Scientists), Gary Nabhan (agricultural ecologist, ethnobotanist, and writer). Register for the workshop.

3. Trashfish: Bycatch Ceviche, Drum Heads & Other Tasty Treats – Moderated by Clare Leshin-Hoar

 

Why Chefs Should Look Beyond Skinless, Boneless White Fleshed Fillets. Although commercial fishermen have been trying to reduce incidents of bycatch — fish accidentally caught while targeting another species – the problem still remains. In 2011, the U.S. produced 1.2 billion pounds of bycatch. Much of that thrown overboard, wasted. But what if we found a way to turn some of those unfamiliar species into enticing and delicious dishes? This session explores how to source local bycatch; tempt guests with unfamiliar seafood. We’ll address underappreciated species in the context of “trash fish,” and we’ll look at the potential benefits and hidden dangers of doing so. Speakers: PJ Stoops (fishmonger, Oxheart Houston), Chef Justin Yu (chef, Oxheart Houston), Kerry and/or Mark Marhefka (owners, Abundant Seafood, Charleston). Register for the workshop.

4. Vegetable Fermentation: Exploring the Possibilities – A Workshop with Sandor Katz

The simple techniques of vegetable fermentation can be applied in infinite creative and appealing ways. Nearly any vegetable, raw or cooked, can be fermented, as can fruits, herbs, and spices. Learn about corn relish, hot sauce, brining fruit, mushroom condiments, fermented chutneys, mashed potato kraut, and brainstorm more variations. Ask troubleshooting questions. Bring your unusual creations to share… Limited to 35. Register for the workshop.

5. I Can Cure That - Hands-on With Craig Deihl at Cypress

Head over to Cypress with Craig Deihl for a hands-on charcuterie workshop. In his restaurant kitchen, you’ll compare heritage pork raised in woodlands, and pasture-raised pork. You’ll work with an American black guinea hog from Gra Moore, as well as lamb from the American Lamb Board. Limited to 20 people. This workshop is full.

6. Mastering the Media

First, the view from 35,000 feet – how are new media changing the way we discuss and market food? How should a time-pressed chef prioritize social tools to elevate her restaurant and promote sustainability? Next, dive deep into messaging and learn to speak so media will listen. This spokesperson training session will take you from the basics of messaging structure, all the way through to finding your center and maintaining authority in the toughest interview. Speakers: Haven Bourque (founder, HavenBMedia), Leslie Hatfield (senior editor, GRACE) Limited to 35. Register for the workshop.

Tuesday Workshops – Full Descriptions

 

1. Hogonomics - Moderated by Barry Estabrook

At a time when many diners are outraged by the rise of the $35 pasture-raised pork chop, the farmer and chef who brought it to the table are very often picking up the tab. The discussion will focus on the tough but rewarding task of bringing high-quality, sustainably raised pork into your operations without losing your shirt or your mind. Beyond discussing hog, you’ll taste the spectrum of available pork.  Speakers: Maisie Ganzler (Bon Appetit Management Co.), Paul Willis (Niman Ranch), Stephen Stryjewski (Cochon), and more to be announced soon. Register for the workshop.

2. Microbes and Flavor: A Closer Look at Fermentation - A Workshop with Rachel Dutton, Ben Wolfe, and Dan Felder

During this breakout session, these three microbial pioneers will have an interactive demonstration and tasting of traditional and not-so-traditional fermented foods. From artisanal cheeses to Momofuku’s latest fermented innovation, they will explore the link between microbial diversity and flavor. Speakers: Rachel Dutton (Microbiologist, Harvard University), Dan Felder (Head of R&D at Momofuku Lab), and Ben Wolfe (Microbiologist/Mycologist, Harvard University). Limited to 35. Register for the workshop.

3. Expanding Options for Sustainable Seafood - Moderated by Sheila Bowman

There’s a lot happening in the world of sustainable seafood. Learn about surprising new seafood recommendations that chefs may not know about – from farmed salmon, to monkfish, grouper, and Chilean seabass – and dive into exciting new ideas that anyone buying and serving fish should be aware of. Speakers: Chef Allen Susser (Chef Allen Consulting), Tim Fitzgerald (Environmental Defense Fund), and more to be announced soon. Limited to 35. Register for the workshop.

4. Sustainability: Table for Two, Four, A Million - Moderated by Arlin Wasserman

Grapple with the challenge of scale – whether you’re a 10-top restaurant or serve all 50 states. In this workshop, you’ll explore instructive “tales from the dark side” – not just success stories but how challenges were met and new strategies were developed. Speakers to be announced soon. Register for the workshop.

5. What We Talk About When We Talk About Aquaculture  - Moderated by Paul Greenberg

Foodies disdain it, America embraces it — like it or hate it, aquaculture is here to stay.  Aquaculture is now the fastest growing food system on the planet and unbeknownst to many Americans a large portion of their seafood plate is determined by its output.  How can we strike a balance with farmed seafood that is both flavorful and healthful?  How can we continue to farm the seas while maintaining wild populations?  And how can we keep coastal communities “fishy” while preserving a balanced approach to both wild and farmed seafood? Beyond discussing fish, you’ll taste the spectrum of farmed and wild fish. Speakers: Cathy Roheim (Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology at the University of Idaho), Michael Rubino (Director of the Office of Aquaculture at the National Marine Fisheries Service), and Scott Nichols (Verlasso). Register for the workshop.